Sahara Reporters Latest News Today Tuesday 13th October 2020

Sahara Reporters Latest News Today Tuesday 13th October 2020

Sahara Reporters Latest News Today and headlines on some of the happenings and news trend in the Country, today 13/10/20

Read also nigeria newspapers Tuesday 13th October 2020

Group Asks United States Government To Place Visa Ban On Oyo Police Commissioner, Family Members

Oyo CP, Nwachukwu Enwonwu.

A pro-democracy group, Concerned Nigerians, has appealed to the United States Government to impose visa restriction on Oyo State Commissioner of Police, Nwachukwu Enwonwu, and members of his family.
The move follows the extrajudicial killing of EndSARS protester, Jimoh Isiaq, by policemen in Ogbomoso.

Oyo CP, Nwachukwu Enwonwu.

According to the letter addressed to the US Ambassador to Nigeria and signed by its Convener, Deji Adeyanju, the group accused Enwonwu of overseeing extra-judicial killings and human rights violations in Oyo.
The letter reads, “We write to urgently appeal to the United States of America and other development partners of Nigeria to place a visa restriction on the Commissioner of Police of Oyo State, Nwachuwu Enwonwu, and members of his family over his handling of the ongoing #EndSARS protest which has led to extrajudicial killings and several human right violations in the state. 
“Despite the pronouncement of the ban yesterday on the Special Anti-Robbery Squad, rights violations have continued in the country especially in Oyo State and another citizen was killed there. Freedom of assemble which is one of the pillars of democracy is now almost a crime in Nigeria. “If this request is granted, it will serve as a deterrent to others who continue to toe the line of violating citizen’s rights.”

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#EndSARS More Of Larger Problem Than Protest By Dr Prince Charles Dickson

Prince Charles Dickson

Often people ask me why I write on certain topics and issues all the time, like bashing governments at all levels and the band of ‘confusionists’ that run them, my take on the education, health and power sector, arguments on ethnicity and the indigene question amongst others. My answer is that I do because I believe that such subjects are important for Nigeria and Nigerians as they are for other nations, but when it appears to me that Nigerians and our leaders particularly do not react to these topics the way they should, I repeat them in new essays to remind old readers and recruit new ones to participate in the continuing dialogue.
So again I am focusing my searchlight on the Nigeria Police and not far from the #Endsars protests…To say that Nigeria today is no longer a secure place is an understatement. The Nigeria Police has had a rugged past and the picture we see in the present does not give us a hope for the future.
Between 1999 and today the police strength has grown from 112,000 to a little above half a million men, despite this increase, crime has equally increased more, because the government in its fast motion to nowhere has not been able to discern the simple fact that even if you recruit 10 million men into the police and still almost 100 million Nigerians hungry, unemployed, frustrated, crime would still be high.
Sadly the police itself is one of the worst culprits of poor remuneration and motivation, have you seen what the police barracks look like across the nation?

Prince Charles Dickson

Despite the poor and degrading nature of our prisons, most police barracks are not different from rehabilitation homes for juveniles. The police have been reduced to an agency of ridicule and hatred amongst the populace. The only robbers they shoot are ordinary citizens who refuse to give them the N20 toll. When they conclude an investigation successfully, it must have been that of a landlord and tenant or two- fighting at a bus stop.
Right from the days of Anini the great robber, the police rather than be the combatants of crime, has been partners in progress to armed robbers, robberies and all manners of social vices. It is that bad, if you have an encounter with robbers you are 70% likely to escape with your life intact and the same encounter with a policeman in possession a pistol, you will have less than 30% chance of survival.
Somebody should tell Mr. Buhari that we do not have a police anymore. A security outfit without equipment, funding, without logistics, no communication facilities resorts to the very crimes they are supposed to protect us from. Divisional Police Offices are now banks; the Divisional Police Officers’ are branch managers waiting daily for ‘returns’ (bribe) from marketing executhiefs (Junior ranks).
When robbers and assassins attack with assault rifles and police come with Dane guns, it is obvious that there is a lot that is wrong.
The edifice called the police is a case of epilepsy, from the change of uniform, to increased recruitment of illiterates that can barely spell their names. The problem is not necessarily just that of the Nigerian police but that of a nation whose leaders have thrown their responsibilities to the gutters.
So while the #endsars protest is good, we forget that FSARS is part of the bigger problem, have you ever seen a SARS of Nigeria Police crime scene unit; the Nigeria Police has a settlement scene unit in every divisional police office. I saw the care and details that goes into securing a crime scene. Does the Nigeria Police have a Behavioral Unit, or do they just arrest you for having dreadlocks or beards, or carrying a laptop.
Have you ever seen a Nigerian policeman wear a protective glove at a crime scene? The closest has been at wedding ceremonies or ceremonial occasions.
I was at a local police station recently and watched as different activities went on, from the radio message alerting another station that Adam was about to eat the apple, to the old Olympia typewriter that brought back memories of my late uncle Atiku who was a teacher in the Congo.
I noticed the state of the uniforms of the rank, the frustration on the face of officers. I saw how men of the force collected N100 to buy plain sheets, file and biro for a complainant to put down his grouse. Why are the SARS officers more often than not dirty and unkempt…oh I hear it’s about being covert.
Talking about the police, it is interesting to look at the police from what it should be. Police are agents or agencies empowered to enforce the law and to affect public and social order through the legitimate use of force.
The term is most commonly associated with police departments of a state that are authorized to exercise the police power of that state within a defined legal or territorial area of responsibility. The word comes via French from the Latin politia (civil administration), which itself derives from the Ancient Greek πόλις, for polis (“city”).
In our experience the police have contributed negatively to an increasingly disjointed social order in the nation. The Nigeria Police has failed the nation in its primary function of providing safety, ensuring public order, enforcing criminal law, traffic regulations, crowd control, criminal investigation etc.
A mad man was assumed to be admiring the police parade at a nearby police post, the Divisional Police Officer walked to him and asked if he wanted to join the police and the mad man answered, I dey mad’.
Like the teaching profession, these days’ people join the force as a last resort, so naturally they vent all the frustrations of life on the job. Bail is free on paper but in practice the price you pay all depends on the offense and the officer in charge.
I once narrated the tale of an officer who stopped the police commissioner in his state and asked for a bribe of N20 or else he was going to arrest him for driving at night alone when the roads were dangerous. How many times have we seen policemen disappear on occasion of an armed robbery, everyone wants to get to heaven, but none wants to die?
A visit to a police barracks tells you the story, poor welfare, houses without common sanitary facilities, falling buildings, electricity disconnected, breeding grounds for miscreants and even worse.
The frustration sips into the policeman’s wife, every nine months another baby, and the thick line of abject poverty, social deprivation moves and finds habitation in the vicious cycle. It is in these situations that officers also wreck havoc, from the pay office, all sorts of fraud occur, the usual illegal deductions, to the ghost officers.
With our police everything is wrong, nothing is right. The new uniforms are only for the Ogas, the material is in the open market and anybody can buy and wear and get a salute. There is a public apathy against the police so much that even if they wore white they would discrete the color.
This #endSARS protest is not just about the police but equally an examination of our society, one that questions our core values. The fact being that we should be asking how did we get here?
The Nigeria Police and members of the FSARS team who are policemen and in cases women are not entirely bad, there are good ones amongst them, infact let me state categorically that there are gentlemen officers and men in the police, but they are sadly negligible…We are having the #EndSARS protests because our police lack 21st century policing skills that thrive more on intelligence gathering, tactical operations, which should bring about clinical execution of their assignments. We lack security operatives that adopt modern techniques in fighting crimes. The Force is devoid of values like the larger Nigerian society, the reason some criminals are also asking for an end to SARS.
Between an endless hope and a hopeless end, let us see hope in the horizon, though this is difficult to see. The situation is bad, let it not be said that we did not talk, write, and even beg the government to do something. When will the Almighty Allah save us from policemen that interrogate, arrest, and detain goats, hens and crates of beer as witnesses, accused and complainants—Only time will tell.

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E2%80%93ibadan-expressway PHOTONEWS: #EndSARS Protesters Block Lagos–Ibadan Expressway

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Fuel Price Hike And Trade Union Negotiations By Izielen Agbon

It was incorrect for the NLC and TUC leaders to agree that the fuel price hike and the deregulation of the PMS market are inevitable. The union leaders should not have agreed that market forces should determine the PMS price without the intervention of the mobilised masses of Nigerian people while the Federal Government itself was interfering in the petroleum products market and deciding the PMS price. It is obvious that they did not understand how the petroleum products market works, the neoliberal roots of the import parity pricing model and its implication for their unions and members in the long run. 
There are two markets that are of interest here. These are the labour market and the petroleum products market. The IMF, Federal Government of Nigeria, the NLC/TLC leaders now argue that market forces dictate prices in the petroleum products market. This is not true. A government Price Review Committee decides the price of PMS in Nigeria. It is a bureaucratic decision or a direct government intervention in the market. The petroleum products market is not a classical free trade market which assumes a large numbers of buyers and  sellers. We know that there are few sellers and many buyers in the PMS market. The market is therefore an oligopolistic sellers market. Left on its own, without any governemnt intervention, prices will tend to be oligopolistic. 
Road transportation is the main mode of transport in Nigeria and PMS is basic to the movement of goods and persons in the nation. It is not a commodity that many buyers can do without. Hence, demand is inelastic. Large increases in prices lead to small changes in demand. Furthermore, a fuel price hike increases the prices of other commodities. The reverse is not true because prices are sticky downwards. A decrease in PMS prices does not lead to a decrease in the prices of other commodities. A fuel price hike results in the reduction of the purchasing power of workers and an increase in general poverty. There are 83 million poor Nigerians who live on less than N377 per day. For these citizens, a fuel price hike puts them on the brinks of survival.

The FGN and its Price Review Committee made a bureaucratic decision to hike PMs prices to N162/ litre under IMF pressures. This is very clear when we examine the constituent parts of their import parity pricing model. The import parity PMS price is the Expected Open Market Price (EOMP). The EOMP is the sum of the benchmark landing cost, the disribution margins and the taxes. There are no taxes on PMS in Nigeria. The distribution margins consist of the retailers, transporters and dealers margins. None of these margins are determined by market forces. They are all determined by government bureaucracies. Under the last Minister of State for Petroleum, Dr. Ibe Kachikwu, these margins were varied abitarily to accomodate the policy of PMS price modulation. 
The benchmark landing cost is made up of cost + freight, traders margin, lightering expenses, NPA, fianancing, jetty depot thru’put charge, storage charge,  bridging fund, marine transport average and admin charge. All the components of the benchmark landing cost, apart from the cost + freight, are determined by Nigerian government bureaucracies. Therefore when we break the PMS import parity price of N162 per litre down to its constituent parts, we find  that there are no invincible markets forces involved. The FGN bureaucracies decides the price of PMS by using the IMF import parity pricing model. This model underdevelopes the refining sector in Nigeria by wiping out our comparative advantage as an oil producing nation. It encourages Nigeria to export raw material (crude oil) and import processed goods (PMS). Our development presuppose that we export PMS rather than  crude oil by building more refiniries. 
The acceptance of the unrestrained dominance of market forces and no market intervention by the NLC and TUC leaders leads us to the second market. Labour power is a comodity in the labour market, just like PMS is a commodity in the petroleum product market. The labour power of a worker is his or her ability to do work. The labour market  has many sellers of labour power (workers) and few buyers of labour power (employers). The market is an oligopolistic buyers market. The price of labour power in the labour market is the worker’s wage. The workers form trade unions to defend their interests. They struggle for higher wages and better conditions of work with the aid of their unions. Trade unions are therefore organs of workers struggles. Public sector workers have governments (local, state and federal) as their employees. When workers fight for higher wages, they are fighting as a class-in-itself. However, if workers fight for a general wage, like a national minimum wage, then they are fighting as a class-for-itself. In this case, the workers confront the government, not as employer, but as the state. They confront the state understood as a bourgeois organ of class rule/domination. They do not confront their individual employers. The struggle is political, a struggle between different classes to determine the minimum clearing price in the national labour market.
Under capitalism, work is the organizing tool of society. Work, understood as activities aimed at generating surplus value, does not occur only in the sphere of production (factory/office), but in the society as a whole. The society as a whole becomes a social factory organized around work, both waged and unwaged. The worker is paid for 8 hours of work at the office/factory. But, the worker and his/her family works after official hours inorder to reproduce their labour power or ability to do work. The worker works from the time he/she wakes up and until the time he/she sleeps. All the work outside the office/factory is unpaid. The worker has to turn on the PMS generator, collect water, take a bath, dress up, do the same for his/her children, prepare breakfast, grab a bus, drop the kids off at school, grab another bus, arrive at the factory/office for work on time. All this may take 3 to 4 hours. Then, he/she spends 8 hours working at the factory/office and repeats the 3-4 hours activities in order to get back home, eat supper, put the children to bed and get some sleep. In the case of students, farmers or small self employed businesses, the whole work is unwaged. All the workers’ (waged and unwaged) activities during the day cost money. The cost of these activities increases as PMS cost increases. Therefore, when the masses fight against a fuel prize hike, they are fighting for their economic self development; for more disposable income and leisure family time. They are fighting the FGN as the state, not as the employer of public sector workers. They are acting as a class-for-itself for their autonomous self development. Thus, when workers trade union seize conrol of the leadership of masses’ struggle against fuel price hike, they are  not negociating with the Federal Government as employer of their members, but as the state, understood as an organ of bourgeoius power/domination. The union leaders represent, not just their members, but all Nigerian waged and unwaged citizens (students, market women, small businesses, farmers etc). It seems the trade union leaders negociating with the FGN did not understand this.
A strike is a tactical tool of class struggle used by workers to gain a power advantage during negociation with their employers or the State as a representative of the power of capital or bourgeois rule/domination. A strike is not a strategic tool of class struggle. It is always temporary and never indefinite. It is aimed at the temporary withdrawal of labour power from the sphere of production in order to bring production or the creation of surplus value to a halt. A temporary interruption of the circuit of capital and the production of surplus value at the sphere of production or the societyy as a whole put the workers’ representatives in a more powerful position during negociation with the State. It does not make any sense to call off a national strike and capitulate to the ideology of the supremacy of some invincible hands of market forces in PMS price determination. Once trader union leaders agree to this in the petroleum product market, it will not take long for the state and employers to impose the same indeological framework on the labour market.
The logical conclusion of the ideological capitulation of the labour leaders in Aso Rock, is that the Nigerian labour market should, just like the PMS market, be governed by market forces without any trade union interventions. This implies not just the removal of automatic deduction of labour union fees from workers’ wages, but also the removal of labour union interventions in the market for labour power. The FGN or the state, as an organ of bougeoius class domination, can deduct taxes from workers’ wages at source. But, the trade unions, as organs of working class strugggle, cannot do this. This is the first display of bourgeois dominance and the State’s attempt to seize control of the labour market under the premise that it is governed by invincible market forces. Once this is successful, it is followed by the enactment of voluntary trade union membership laws and finally by Right-to-Work laws. Under Right-to-Work laws/rules, trade unions are not recognized as representatives of workers during negociations. If market forces govern the labour market, then there is no need for the intervention of trade unions in the determination of the condition of work or wages understood as the price of labour power. Each worker handles his/her wage negociation personally. They would not be required to belong to a trade union. This is the logical  conclusion of the acceptance of market forces as the determinant of the prices of commodities (PMS) in the petroleum products market and commodities (labour power) in the labour market. It is, on the long run, ideological suscide for the trade unions. This is why there was wild jubilation in the board rooms of Nigerian capital and the corridors of Aso Rock when the trade union leaders capitulated to the ideology of unrestrained invincible market forces and no market interventions. It will not be very long before the state (FGN) and the employers come for the trade unions themselves.
Izielen AgbonIzielenagbon@yahoo.comTwitter: @izielenagbonNov. 3,  2020

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Restructuring And Its Deceitful Proponents By Peter Claver Oparah

Peter Claver Oparah

For the umpteenth time, I am writing about the noisy clamour for restructuring which seems to be a cure-all placebo for all manners of political discontent in Nigeria today. As in previous times I had written, I still hold onto my position that there is nothing more than political deceit around the noisome restructuring clamour and no time is that dubious political content obvious than now.
If I may ask, why is it that there is still no clear, concise and generally accepted idea of restructuring several years after that bogus and inchoate demand made its way into our chaotic national discourse? What is amazing is that as at today, so many people mouth restructuring without anyone showing the light as to how it could be realised and what outcome would be acceptable to the diverse groups that have invested hope in it to cure all the national maladies Nigeria has accumulated since independence.
Strangely, the term has remained bogus, undefined, queer and unclear while it has become a ready hatchet in the hands of all manners of displaced politicians who employ it to sow rancour, division, hatred and schism among Nigerians. 

Peter Claver Oparah

As I contended in a previous report I did on the issue, restructuring, as presently employed in Nigeria, is like an elephant felt by 100 blind men. All describe the elephant by whatever part of the body he feels and this bodes more confusion and discord  among the blind men as to what the elephant really is. That is the absurd trajectory sorounding the present clamour for restructuring. It is strange that none of the people or groups welding this political cudgel has attempted to give a clear roadmap into what the term practically translates to all Nigerians. None has told us how restructuring could be brought about besides noisily telling the President in a democracy to ‘restructure Nigeria’. 
No one has told us how Nigeria will look like after restructuring except the pandering of utopian visages of an eldorado that Nigeria will turn into after ‘Buhari has restructured Nigeria’. 
As it is today, restructuring has become a deadly political weapon those who find themselves holding the shorter ends of the country’s political stick employ to get back at the country and possibly secure a firmer hold on the politics of the country. What is amazing is that many of these fellows were once in leadership positions where they would have restructured Nigeria but criminalised demands for restructuring when they were in power. Take the case of former President Olusegun Obasanjo. Cumulatively, he has ruled Nigeria for 11 years, which was long enough to restructure Nigeria to an eldorado. But Obasanjo did nothing of that. In fact, he was known to roundly abuse those asking for restructuring when he was civilian President. The term was practically outlawed during his regime but today, Obasanjo has made the loud deceitful clamour for restructuring his sole anthem!
Some have equally used the duplicitous demand for restructuring to blackmail the North given that a Northerner is in power but in our present 21 years of democratic governance, the South had been in power for 14 years, why was it so difficult for the South to restructure Nigeria to its taste in those 14 years? Why did those Southern regimes outlaw restructuring when they were in power and now find it so attractive that they are blackmailing a regime that is only five years in power? That shows the dubious, divisive and acrid political wrapping that encases the present noisy restructuring demand.
But not to miss the essence of this report, there is little or no good faith in the present, noisy and distracting demand for restructuring. There is a huge dosage of mischief and political guile in the clamour. Those that have made restructuring their sole mantra have done nothing to give conceptual clarity to the term, what it is all about, what the outcome holds for each and every Nigerian, who should bring it about and how such a person should go about it. In the absence of such clear specifics, restructuring is only a dangerous cudgel that is weilded by ethnic irtidentists, displaced political profiteers, those who seek political relevance or who are worsened by their placement in the present political structure in Nigeria. 
For the avoidance of doubt, Nigeria has no structural problem. The problem lies on Nigerians deliberately sabotaging the system and using the outcome to cause further damage to our collective purposes and interests. Take the issue of local government autonomy for instance, the third tier of government that should take governance closer to the people has been annexed and vassalled by states which end up appropriating the humongous amounts that are allocated to this important tier from the federation account each month and killing this tier. Under the watch of previous regimes including the one headed by Obasanjo who has become one of the queer apostles of deceptive restructuring, this order worsened thus obliterating a vital third tier of government. But the Buhari regime against whom this present dubious clamour for restructuring targets, has boldly issued orders that will restore the efficacy and financial autonomy of local governments and also the judiciary and state assemblies. Curiously most of the advocates of the present restructuring lingo, supported and urged the governors to oppose this bold move that should take governance down the grassroots, just for their dubious evergreen political interests. This should be a defining move to assert the existing structural tenets of the country. This should be a critical component of power devolution which has been one of the snippets advocates of restructuring have been mouthing. 
So silly is the demand that Buhari ‘should restructure Nigeria’. Sho? In a democracy with clear cut division of responsibilities? Should Buhari transmogrify into an absolute dictator to do this? This is what happens when a people buy into what they hardly understand but which is marketed by vile and sly politicians. I think the power to tinker with the structure of Nigeria in a democracy should lie with the legislature. Why demanding Buhari to give you restructuring when you have representatives you elected to the national and state legislatures? This reprehensible demand that Buhari should restructure Nigeria exposes the dubiousness and ignorance of the noisy advocates of restructuring.
However, I believe if restructuring is the desire of majority of Nigerians, it is realisable within the extent legal constitutional framework of the country. What the agitators need to do is to develop a buyable idea of the term; what restructuring is all about, what the various people will benefit, how it will strengthen the country. Having done this, they need to aggressively market it across the nooks and crannies of Nigeria. Then, they need to approach their representatives in the legislature to enact bills to that effect and drive those bills through laid down legislative procedures. Anything done besides this is mere political gimmicks deployed to satiate ulterior and murky political interests and nothing more. 
To sum my viewpoint, there is nothing wrong with the structure and laws of the country. What is wrong is the attitude of most Nigerians to sabotage the system and stultify the merits we stand to gain as a multi-ethnic nation because of narrow, transient political interests.  What is wrong is the self-destructive penchant of Nigerians to sabotage themselves and the nation for their nebulous interests. Let Nigerians work to enforce and strengthen the structure and the laws beyond their deadly crave for selfish political interests and the country and all Nigerians will be the better for it. 
Peter Claver OparahIkeja, Lagos.E-mail: peterclaver2000@yahoo.com

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E2%80%AAendsars-%E2%80%ACprotesters-defy-governor-wikes-warning-demonstrate-across-port-harcourt Rivers ‪#EndSARS ‬Protesters Defy Governor Wike’s Warning, Demonstrate Across Port Harcourt In Multitudes

Residents of Port Harcourt on Tuesday defied the order by Rivers State Government banning protest and marched through major roads seeking an end to police brutality.
Governor Nyesom Wike had in a statement on Monday announced that his government had banned all forms of protests throughout the state.

He said, “Therefore all proposed protests under #EndSars campaign are hereby prohibited. Government took this decision because the Inspector-General of Police, Mohammed Adamu, had already scrapped the Special Anti-Robbery Squad.
“Therefore, there is no need for any form of protest against a unit of the Police Force that no longer exists. Parents and guardians are therefore advised to ensure that their children or wards do not violate this order.
“Law enforcement agencies are also directed to ensure that the ban is enforced and that violators are brought to book.”
But the #EndSARS protesters defied the order and gathered at the Port Harcourt Pleasure Park as early as 8:00am.
They insisted that more concrete steps must be taken on proscribing SARS since similar directives had been given in the past.

Video of Port Harcourt #SARSMUSTEND Protesters Defy Wike, March On The Streets

Port Harcourt #SARSMUSTEND Protesters Defy Wike, March On The Streets

WATCH VIDEO: Port Harcourt #SARSMUSTEND Protesters Defy Wike, March On The Streets

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BREAKING: Many Policemen Feared Dead In Ondo Auto Crash

An unconfirmed number of policemen have been feared killed in a lone accident in Akure, Ondo State.
SaharaReporters gathered that the accident occurred at about 11:00am on Tuesday around Airport Road, Oba-Ile area of the state capital.

According to eyewitnesses, the crash was caused by speeding and recklessness by the van’s driver.

The casualty figure was still sketchy as of the time of this report.

State police spokesperson, Tee-Leo Ikoro, confirmed the incident.
“Yes, there was an accident but I don’t have much details now. We just sent people to the scene,” he told SaharaReporters.

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Lawyers In Lagos Protest Police Brutality

Lawyers in Lagos State on Tuesday boycotted court sessions to attend anti-police brutality protest.
The lawyers joined thousands of Nigerians calling for an end to the Special Anti-Robbery Squad as well as extensive police reforms.

Speaking at the protest, Inibehe Effiong, a rights lawyer, said it is highly unjust that Nigerians leave their homes everyday without the guarantee that they would return home due to excesses by officers paid to keep them safe.

He and other protesters called on the Lagos State Police Commissioner, Hakeem Odumosu, who was also present at the protest, to address the concerns of many Nigerians by holding his officers to account.

PHOTONEWS: Lawyers In Lagos Join March Against Brutality In Nigeria#EndPoliceBrutality #EndSARS #SARAMUSTEND pic.twitter.com/AR81LASbU7— Sahara Reporters (@SaharaReporters) October 13, 2020

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BREAKING: INEC Presents Certificate Of Returns To Akeredolu

The Independent National Electoral Commission has presented Certificate of Return to Ondo State governor, Oluwarotimi Akeredolu, deputy governor-Elect, Lucky Orimisan Aiyedatiwa.
The certificates were presented at the INEC office in the state.

Ondo Resident Electoral Commissioner, Ambassador Rufus Akeju, presented the certificate of return to Akeredolu and Aiyedatiwa.

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Buhari Appoints Media Aide, Lauretta Onochie, As INEC Commissioner

Lauretta Onochie

President Muhammadu Buhari has asked the Senate to confirm the appointment of his Special Assistant on Social Media, Lauretta Onochie, and three others as commissioners of the Independent National Electoral Commission.
President of the Senate, Ahmad Lawan, on Tuesday read the letter from Buhari on the floor of the Senate.

Lauretta Onochie

Others are Prof Mohammed Sani Katsina), Prof Kunle Ajayi (Ekiti), and Seidu Ahmed (Jigawa).
“Appointment for commissioners for INEC. Pursuant to paragraph 14 of part 11 of the first schedule of the 1999 constitution,” Buhari said.
Onochie is famous for making controversial posts on social media.

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